O’Brien Coin Guide: GB & Ireland Bronze Pennies of Edward VII


Introduction:

The GB & Ireland “Edward VII” pennies are an easy series to collect as there is only one major variety (the 1902 low tide) and that too is not exactly scarce. As with all of the earlier GB & Ireland bronzes, the highest grades command a significant premium and the coins in the lower grades are still quite common.

1902 GB & Ireland bronze penny (Edward VII, high & low tide varieties)

1902 GB & Ireland bronze penny (Edward VII, high & low tide varieties)

Bronze Penny: Edward VII

  • Alloy: Bronze (95% copper, 4% tin and 1% zinc)
  • Weight: 9.4g
  • Diameter: 30.8mm
  • Edge: Plain
  • Designers
    • Obverse: George William De Saulles (DES)
    • Reverse: Harold Wilson Parker (WP)
1908 GB & Ireland bronze penny (Edward VII)

1908 GB & Ireland bronze penny (Edward VII)

Obverse:

  • Bare head of King Edward VII facing right,with the surrounding legend:
    • Legend: +EDWARDVS VII DEI GRA: BRITT: OMN: REX FID: DEF: IND: IMP:
    • Full Latin text: EDWARDVS VII DEI GRATIA BRITANNIARUM OMNIUM REX FIDEI DEFENSOR INDIAE IMPERATOR
    • Translation: Edward the Seventh, by the Grace of God, King of all the Britains, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India

Reverse:

  • Britannia seated facing right, wearing a helmet, holding a trident, hand resting on a shield, with the words ‘ONE PENNY’ in the fields, and date below.
  • A lighthouse is in the background to the left of Britannia.

Mintage & Market Values:

1902-1910 GB & Ireland bronze penny (Edward VII) mintage & market values

1902-1910 GB & Ireland bronze penny (Edward VII) mintage & market values

 

Further Reading:

 

 

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3 thoughts on “O’Brien Coin Guide: GB & Ireland Bronze Pennies of Edward VII

    • Specimen strikings (also known as proofs or trials) were produced in silver and gold for most months
      but these tend to be extremely RARE.

      The surviving Gunmoney dies were confiscated by William of Orange and taken back to London. It is thought that some of these dies might have been used to produce ‘additional strikes’ in a variety of metals by staff at The Royal Mint around the end of the 18th C.
      – this would not have happened with official approval
      – if it did happen, it is likely it was done for a wealthy collector

      This type of material is a bit of a ‘hot potato’ so far as collectors are concerned,
      so if you are buying, do make sure you are buying from a reputable source.

      Of course, do be careful not to confuse genuine coins with modern ‘replicas’ which are, in my opinion,
      a complete waste of money and should be banned unless they include the word ‘replica’ on each piece.

      Like

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