Cork, under Commonwealth authority, Farthing token, overstruck on a Double Tournois of Louis XIII

The Proliferation of Unofficial Irish ‘Farthing Tokens’ in the 17th Century

By the first half of the 17th C, the copper coinage in both Britain and Ireland was in complete disarray. Neither James I nor his son, Charles I, took much interest in providing small denominations and ‘farmed out’ the Royal prerogative of minting copper coins to ‘favourite’ courtiers as patentees – Lords Harington, Richmond, Lennox and Maltravers were the principal…

The Irish Armstrong farthing legend reads as follows :- CAROLVS II D G M B FRA ET HIB REX which translates and expands to :- Charles II by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland

O’Brien Coin Guide: Armstrong’s ‘Patent’ Irish Farthings (1660-61) for Charles II

Upon his restoration to the crown in 1660, King Charles II granted a patent to Sir Thomas Armstrong to ‘coin farthings’ for the next twenty years and all other (unofficial) farthings were to be prohibited.   In 1661, two royal proclamations were issued prohibiting the issuing and use of brass or copper tokens In 1662,…