Promissory Note: Six Guineas (or, Six Pounds, Sixteen Shillings & Sixpence) - Watson's Bank, Clonmel, Co Tipperary. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Banknote Guide: Six Guineas The Clonmel Bank (Watson’s Bank), c. 1800

The Clonmel Bank Watson’s Bank was located on Johnston Street, in Clonmel and was founded by Solomon Watson in 1800, along with two of his brothers (John Watson and William Watson) as partners. The Watson’s were a well known Quaker family in Clonmel and their bank went through 3 partnership changes before ceasing operation in…

18__ Killarney, Ross Island Mine, Three Guineas, 18–, uniface proof on paper. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

O’Brien Banknote Guide: Ross Island Mine (Killarney) 1804-c.1819

Introduction: The history of mining at Ross Island in Killarney, Co Kerry, can be traced back to the Bronze Age, where several ancient metal finds from Killarney point to a significant Early Bronze Age settlement in the area. The Bronze Age Workings: The Bronze Age work camp at Ross Island provides an insight into daily…

Clonmell Bank, Two Guineas (Two Pounds, Five Shillings and Sixpence), 4 October 1809, B 168, payable in Bank of Ireland Paper, for William Riall, Charles Riall and Arthur Riall, signature of Arthur Riall. Endorsements on back, pinholes, small holes, tear and missing small piece at top right, otherwise very good. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Banknote Guide: Two Guineas The Clonmell Bank (Riall’s Bank)

The Clonmell Bank Riall’s Bank in Clonmel was one of the best run banks of its time. Founded in 1715 as The Clonmell Bank by Phineas Riall and managed by him until 1724, the bank was known as Bagwell & Co between 1724 and 1754. In 1754, William Riall became senior partner and he traded…

1713 Sight Note (£28, 1s & 4d) James Swift. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Banknote Guide: James Swift & Co (Dublin) 1721-1746

Introduction: James Swift registered his bank in Dublin in 1721 but he was operating in Dublin beforehand, probably as a Goldsmith notory or banker of some description – as can be seen by this ‘sight note’ from Sir Francis Child (a London Goldsmith and banker). Sight note, 14 May 1713, ‘At three days sight pay…

180_ Kinsale (Corporation), Threepence (for the convenience of change). The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Banknote Guide: 180(4) Kinsale Corporation (3d note)

Date: c.1804 Few people had silver or gold coins, and those who did, hoarded them and did not use them unless they really had to. Most of the smaller change in circulation was unofficial, illegal tokens. In short, there was a local currency crisis. The solution was small notes (an IOU) like the one below…

1834 Dublin, Gibbons & Williams Bank, Three Pounds, 4 December 1834, no. 5484, unissued, with counterfoil (PB 159). The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

O’Brien Banknote Guide: Gibbons & Williams Bank, Dublin (1833-1835)

Introduction: The short-lived Gibbons & Williams Bank issued some of the most attractive banknotes of the period – being printed on both sides and featuring many beautiful vignettes of Dublin and agricultural themes. As such, they are highly sought after by collectors. Their one pound, thirty shilling and three pound notes were payable in Dublin…