180_ Kinsale (Corporation), Threepence (for the convenience of change). The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Banknote Guide: 180(4) Kinsale Corporation (3d note)

Date: c.1804 Few people had silver or gold coins, and those who did, hoarded them and did not use them unless they really had to. Most of the smaller change in circulation was unofficial, illegal tokens. In short, there was a local currency crisis. The solution was small notes (an IOU) like the one below…

1797 Killarney, William Murphy, Sixpence ha'penny, 7 March 1797, signed by William Murphy. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Early Irish Banknotes: Killarney, William Murphy (Sixpence ha’penny) 1797

The Killarney Bank: This ‘bank’ does not appear to have ever been registered and, if the stories about are anything to go by, its lack of official registration is easily explained. The bank was run by one William Murphy – a saddler in the town of Killarney – and his notes were used as small…

c. 1804 Deenagh Mills, Killarney, One Guinea (One pound, two shillings & ninepence)

Early Irish Banknotes: Killarney, Deanagh Mills (One Guinea) 180_ (un-issued)

Deanagh Mills Tradesman’s Note This establishment was never registered as a ‘bank’ per se and, as a result, its notes are listed as a Tradesman Issue in the Paper Money of Ireland catalogue. That said, their banknotes were produced to a high standard and the surviving banknotes (usually un-issued) are of good quality and usually…