Early Irish Banknotes: Killarney, Deanagh Mills (One Guinea) 180_ (un-issued)


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Deanagh Mills Tradesman’s Note

This establishment was never registered as a ‘bank’ per se and, as a result, its notes are listed as a Tradesman Issue in the Paper Money of Ireland catalogue. That said, their banknotes were produced to a high standard and the surviving banknotes (usually un-issued) are of good quality and usually found in the higher grades.

In Slater’s National Commercial Directory of Ireland of 1846, the proprietor is listed as one Christopher Gallwey and, back in 1800, we can see his name in scrolling text on the left-hand side of his note. He appears to have been the owner of the mill but, nore importantly, he was a land agent for Lord Kenmare and, as such, Gallwey would have been trusted to ‘honour’ his paper.

c. 1804 Christopher Gallwey engraving on a One Guinea banknote (tradesman Issue), Killarney, Co Kerry, Ireland

Christopher Gallwey’s name engraved on his One Guinea ‘tradesman note’ Killarney, Co Kerry

One Pound, Two Shillings & Ninepence (One Guinea)

c. 1804 Deenagh Mills, Killarney, One Guinea (One pound, two shillings & ninepence)

c. 1804 Deenagh Mills, Killarney, One Guinea (One pound, two shillings & ninepence) OBVERSE

  • Killarney, Deenagh Mills, unissued 1 Guinea £1, Two Shillings and Ninepence,
    • Thought to have been issued c. 1804
    • Embossed seal at top right, pinholes along counterfoil
    • The name “Christopher Gallwey” engraved (vertically, bottom to top) on the left-hand side
c. 1804 Deenagh Mills, Killarney, One Guinea (One pound, two shillings & ninepence) reverse embossed

Blank REVERSE, showing ‘mirror image’ ink and embossing (from the obverse).

Deanagh Mills

Not a lot is known about Deanagh Mills, except that it was a corn mill on the Deanagh River, operated by Christopher Gallwey from 1781 to 1861, (Blake & Callaway page 85).

More is known about the proprietor:

Christopher Gallwey

  • Christopher Gallwey was born in 1782, to Thomas Gallwey (born in 1746, in Killery, Co. Kerry) and Maria Gallwey (nee Mahony, born on March 14 1758, in Dunloe, Co Kerry).
    • In 1811, at the age of 29, he married Lucinda Gallwey (nee Grehan, born in 1789, in Dublin).
      • They had 9 children
      • She died the 14th of December 1829, aged 57.
    • In 1833, at the age of 51, he married Anne Gallwey (nee French, born c. 1805, in Co. Meath).
      • Christopher Gallwey died in 1861, aged 79.
  • In the 1830s, Christopher Gallway is mentioned as agent to Lord Kenmare in the Ordnance Survey Name Books. He is recorded as the proprietor of several large business concerns in and around Killarney at the time of Griffith’s Valuation.
    • Royal Victoria Hotel
      • Christopher Gallway was leasing this property to Thomas Finn at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £65. This appears to be the Royal Victoria Hotel.
      • In the early 1940s the Irish Tourist Association Survey noted that the Victoria Hotel “once the finest hotel in the district” had been converted into a farmhouse “about 130 years” and that there was an expectation that it was to be converted into a golf clubhouse.
      • The site is now occupied by the Castlerosse Hotel, opened in 1960
    • Ballymalis
      • Christopher Gallway was leasing a property from John Sealy, which included a mill, at Ballymalis at the time of Griffith’s valuation. It was then valued at £34.
      • It is labelled “paper mill” on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map and as “woollen mill” on the 25-inch edition of the 1890s. An extensive range of buildings still exists at the site.
    • Killarney Mills
      • Christopher Gallway was leasing an extensive milling concern from the Kenmare estate at the time of Griffith’s Valuation. It was then valued at £85.
        • Lewis refers to “the extensive flour-mills of Messers Galway and Leahy, worked by the river Dinagh” in 1837.
        • Lyons notes that the mill complex was sold in the Encumbered Estates Court in 1855 and purchased by Richard Leahy for £1,500.
          • The Freeman’s Journal, however, reported that it was purchased in trust by Mr. McGrath for £1,500.
          • Deanough Mills (Encumbered Estates Court Sale Notice), prop. Christopher Gallwey & Richard Leahy. (Deanagh Mills, Killarney, Co Kerry, Ireland)

            Deanough Mills (Encumbered Estates Court Sale Notice)

        • It was taken over by the Electricity Supply Board in 1940.
        • The mills are no longer extant.
    • Torc View (Torc View Hotel)
      • Jeremiah Hurley was leasing a hotel valued at £40 from the Gallway estate at the time of Griffith’s Valuation. This was the Torc View Hotel. Horgan states that the building was later purchased by the Loreto Sisters and opened as a boarding school.
        • It is labelled Loreto Convent on the 25-inch map of the 1890s.
        • The site is now occupied by town houses.
    • Cloonlara
      • Christopher Gallway was leasing this property to William Hickson at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £7 5s.
        • A farm is still extant at the site.
    • Inchinveema
      • Christopher Gallway was leasing this property to Daniel Sullivan at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, when it was valued at £6.
        • Buildings are still extant at the site.
    • Gallwey was also one of the principal lessors of property in the parish of Molahiffe, barony of Magunihy, at the same time.

Lucy Gallwey

In Muckross Abbey, there is a stone monument to Lucy Gallwey – so generally esteemed that the inhabitants of Killarney erected the memorial.

Lucy Gallwey memorial, Muckross Abbey, Killarney, Co Kerry. Wife of Christopher Gallwey of Killarney, Esq. This monument was erected By the inhabitants of Killarney and its neighbourhood to testify The deep sense of those amongst whom she lived And the Exemplary fidelity With which she discharged the relative duties of wife mother and friend as well as to perpetuate the recollections of the many benefits she conferred upon society and to hold up to the emulations of posterity her active useful yet unostentatious exercise of the most ardent charity directed by a singularly sound and well regulated understanding. She died the 14th of December 1829 aged 57

Lucy Gallwey memorial, Muckross Abbey, Killarney, Co Kerry.

“Wife of Christopher Gallwey of Killarney, Esq. This monument was erected By the inhabitants of Killarney and its neighbourhood to testify The deep sense of those amongst whom she lived And the Exemplary fidelity With which she discharged the relative duties of wife mother and friend as well as to perpetuate the recollections of the many benefits she conferred upon society and to hold up to the emulations of posterity her active useful yet unostentatious exercise of the most ardent charity directed by a singularly sound and well regulated understanding.”

Archival Sources:

Contemporary Printed Sources:

Many of these resources are now available online.

 

 

Modern printed sources:

Other Sources:

 

 

 

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