1713 Sight Note (£28, 1s & 4d) James Swift. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Banknote Guide: James Swift & Co (Dublin) 1721-1746

Introduction: James Swift registered his bank in Dublin in 1721 but he was operating in Dublin beforehand, probably as a Goldsmith notory or banker of some description – as can be seen by this ‘sight note’ from Sir Francis Child (a London Goldsmith and banker). Sight note, 14 May 1713, ‘At three days sight pay…

180_ Kinsale (Corporation), Threepence (for the convenience of change). The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Banknote Guide: 180(4) Kinsale Corporation (3d note)

Date: c.1804 Few people had silver or gold coins, and those who did, hoarded them and did not use them unless they really had to. Most of the smaller change in circulation was unofficial, illegal tokens. In short, there was a local currency crisis. The solution was small notes (an IOU) like the one below…

1834 Dublin, Gibbons & Williams Bank, Three Pounds, 4 December 1834, no. 5484, unissued, with counterfoil (PB 159). The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

O’Brien Banknote Guide: Gibbons & Williams Bank, Dublin (1833-1835)

Introduction: The short-lived Gibbons & Williams Bank issued some of the most attractive banknotes of the period – being printed on both sides and featuring many beautiful vignettes of Dublin and agricultural themes. As such, they are highly sought after by collectors. Their one pound, thirty shilling and three pound notes were payable in Dublin…

Henry II of England, Short Cross Class 1B Penny, Moneyer Oslac of Worcester

O’Brien Coin Guide: Why did Henry II not issue coins for Ireland?

Background Henry’s Troubled Succession Henry was born in France at Le Mans on 5 March 1133 as the eldest child of Geoffrey the Fair, Count of Anjou, and the Empress Matilda, so titled because of her first marriage to Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor. Henry’s mother was a very powerful woman: She was the…

The Irish Armstrong farthing legend reads as follows :- CAROLVS II D G M B FRA ET HIB REX which translates and expands to :- Charles II by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland

O’Brien Coin Guide: Armstrong’s ‘Patent’ Irish Farthings (1660-61) for Charles II

Upon his restoration to the crown in 1660, King Charles II granted a patent to Sir Thomas Armstrong to ‘coin farthings’ for the next twenty years and all other (unofficial) farthings were to be prohibited.   In 1661, two royal proclamations were issued prohibiting the issuing and use of brass or copper tokens In 1662,…