Modern Banknotes

Irish Banknotes for sale (coming soon)

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19th C Nationalist Issues:

War of Independence Issues:

Post-Independence Issues

In 1923, the British and Irish Free State Governments had made an informal agreement to divide the Stamp Duty on circulating Irish Joint-Stock banknotes. This measure was put in place to avoid double taxation of the Irish banks.

  • The Government of Northern Ireland would collect the duty on banknotes from:
    • The Northern Bank, Ulster Bank and the Belfast Banking Company
  • The Government of the Irish Free State would collect the duty on the notes of:
    • The Bank of Ireland, the Provincial Bank and the National Bank

After that task was completed, the need for a distinctive Irish currency and an authority to control its issue became apparent to Irish government officials.

  • A Banking Commission was appointed on 8 March 1926 by the Minister for Finance, Ernest Blythe, to study the matter.

The move from the issues of six Joint-Stock Banks (which were not legal tender) to the issues of a Central Bank.

 

A-Series (Lavery Notes)

Lavery Type 1 – Currency Commission Irish Free State

Currency Commission Saorstat Eireann

The Currency Commission (Coimisiún Airgid Reatha) of the Irish Free State, was created by the Currency Act, 1927 (Section 14) as part of the policy of the Irish Free State to set up and issue its own currency, sometimes known as the ‘Saorstát pound’. The Currency Commission commissioned the “A Series” Banknotes, through the advice of an advisory commission.

The Consolidated Banks (Ploughman) Series

This series of banknotes were never legal tender notes but essentially equivalent to “promissory notes” that continue to be issued today by some banks in Northern Ireland and Scotland.  These notes were first issued between 6 May and 10 June 1929 on the proviso that the eight banks operating in the Irish Free State withdrew their previously issued notes from circulation and ceased to issue their own notes.

Ireland - Consolidated Banks (Ploughman) Notes. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland

These notes were eventually withdrawn and, in the instance of the £20, £50 and £100 notes, they were completely withdrawn and no ‘circulating’ examples survived. There are varieties in terms of the eight different bank titles and the various signature combinations of their directors.

ONE POUND

  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Bank of Ireland £1, Type 1 (J. Brennan & J.A. Gargan)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Bank of Ireland £1, Type 2 (J. Brennan & H.J. Johnston)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Hibernian Bank £1, Type 1 (J. Brennan & H.J. Campbell)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Hibernian Bank £1, Type 2 (J. Brennan & A.K. Hodges)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Munster & Leinster Bank £1, Type 1 (J. Brennan & J.L. Cubbins)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Munster & Leinster Bank £1, Type 2 (J. Brennan & A.E. Hosford)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: National Bank £1, Only one issue (J. Brennan & H.A. Russell)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Northern Bank £1, Type 1 (J. Brennan & S.W. Knox)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Northern Bank £1, Type 2 (J. Brennan & H.H. Stewart)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Northern Bank £1, Type 3 (J. Brennan & W.F. Scott)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Northern Bank £1, Type 4 (J. Brennan & A.P. Tibbey)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Provincial Bank £1, Type 1 (J. Brennan & H. Robertson)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Provincial Bank £1, Type 2 (J. Brennan & F.S. Forde)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Provincial Bank £1, Type 3 (J. Brennan & G.A. Kennedy)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Royal Bank of Ireland £1, Type 1 (J. Brennan & G.A. Stanley)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Royal Bank of Ireland £1, Type 2 (J. Brennan & D.R. Mack)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Royal Bank of Ireland £1, Type 3 (J. Brennan & J.S. Wilson)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Ulster Bank £1, Type 1 (J. Brennan & C.W. Patton)
  • Modern Irish Banknotes: Ulster Bank £1, Type 2 (J. Brennan & C.W. Lester)

FIVE POUNDS

TEN POUNDS

TWENTY POUNDS

  • Ploughman £20 notes – all withdrawn by CBI / no survivors

FIFTY POUNDS

  • Ploughman £50 notes – all withdrawn by CBI / no survivors

ONE HUNDRED POUNDS

  • Ploughman £100 notes – all withdrawn by CBI / no survivors

 

  • Price Guides:

  • O’Brien Banknote Price Guide 2019: Ploughman £1 notes
  • O’Brien Banknote Price Guide 2019: Ploughman £5 notes (Coming soon)
  • O’Brien Banknote Price Guide 2019: Ploughman £10 notes (Coming soon)
  • O’Brien Banknote Price Guide 2019: Ploughman £20, £50 and £100 Notes (Specimens, Colour Trials & Proofs)
  • Specialist Guides:

  • O’Brien Rare Banknote Review: Bank of Ireland (Ploughman Notes)
  • O’Brien Rare Banknote Review: Hibernian Bank (Ploughman Notes)
  • O’Brien Rare Banknote Review: Munster & Leinster Bank (Ploughman Notes)
  • O’Brien Rare Banknote Review: National Bank (Ploughman Notes)
  • O’Brien Rare Banknote Review: Northern Bank (Ploughman Notes)
  • O’Brien Rare Banknote Review: Provincial Bank of Ireland (Ploughman Notes)
  • O’Brien Rare Banknote Review: Royal Bank of Ireland (Ploughman Notes)
  • O’Brien Rare Banknote Review: Ulster Bank (Ploughman Notes)

The Consolidated Banks ‘Ploughman’ notes were issued by the Currency Commission of Ireland and the last notes were printed in 1941.  As such, it was a period of transition whereby a new Central Bank was set up by the newly independent Irish Free State. It also meant that the Bank of Ireland stopped acting as an intermittent, quasi-central bank.

  • These beautiful notes were officially withdrawn on 31 December 1953.
  • These Irish banks continued to issue their own notes in Northern Ireland – albeit with new designs.

Series A (Lavery), cont’d.

Currency Commission of Ireland - name change 1937

The Currency Commission (Coimisiún Airgid Reatha) of the Irish Free State, was created by the Currency Act, 1927 (Section 14) as part of the policy of the Irish Free State to set up and issue its own currency but, when the Irish Constitution was changed in 1937, the Irish Free State was no more and it was replaced by the IRELAND, or ÉIRE on the banknotes and coins from thence forward.

Lavery Type 2 – Currency Commission Ireland (No war codes)

Lavery Type 3 – Currency Commission Ireland (War Codes)

Currency Commission Ireland - War Codes. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

  • The Currency Commission Ireland Banknotes (1940-1942)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: 10/- Currency Commission Ireland (War Codes) 1940-42
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £1 Currency Commission Ireland (War Codes) 1940-42

      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Currency Commission, Lavery Type 3a, One Pound (T)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Currency Commission, Lavery Type 3b, One Pound (B)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Currency Commission, Lavery Type 3c, One Pound (P)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Currency Commission, Lavery Type 3d, One Pound (V)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £5 Currency Commission Ireland (War Codes) 1940-42

      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Currency Commission, Lavery Type 3a, Five Pounds (A)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Currency Commission, Lavery Type 3b, Five Pounds (C)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Currency Commission, Lavery Type 3c, Five Pounds (D)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £10 Currency Commission Ireland (War Codes) 1940-42

      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Currency Commission, Lavery Type 3a, Ten Pounds (E)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Currency Commission, Lavery Type 3b, Ten Pounds (F)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £20 Currency Commission Ireland (War Codes)
      • None issued
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £50 Currency Commission Ireland (War Codes)
      • None issued
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £100 Currency Commission Ireland (War Codes)
      • None issued

Lavery Type 4 – Central Bank of Ireland (War Codes)

Central Bank of Ireland - War Codes. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

  • The Central Bank of Ireland Banknotes (1943-1944)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: 10/- Central Bank of Ireland (War Codes)

    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: Central Bank of Ireland (War Codes)

      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4a, One Pound (G)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4b, One Pound (Y)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4c, One Pound (E)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4d, One Pound (F)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £5 Central Bank of Ireland (War Codes)

      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4a, Five Pounds (N)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4b, Five Pounds (R)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4c, Five Pounds (M)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £10 Central Bank of Ireland (War Codes)

      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4a, Ten Pounds (S)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4b, Ten Pounds (W)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4c, Ten Pounds (B)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4d, Ten Pounds (G)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £20 Central Bank of Ireland (War Codes)

      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 4a, Twenty Pounds (A)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £50 Central Bank of Ireland (War Codes)
      • None issued
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £100 Central Bank of Ireland (War Codes)
      • None issued

Lavery Type 5 – Central Bank of Ireland (Post-War)

Once the Second World War was over, and the worry that Britain might choose to invade Ireland (before the Germans did), the perceived need for security codes abated and the Central Bank of Ireland could drop the War Codes. Nothing much else changed, apart from the signatory combinations. As before, all Irish banknotes were denominated in Sterling and payable in London.

Sterling panel - £1

  • The Central Bank of Ireland Banknotes, Lavery Type 5 (1945-1960)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: 10/- Central Bank of Ireland (Sterling)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5a, Ten Shillings
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5b, Ten Shillings
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5c, Ten Shillings
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £1 Central Bank of Ireland (Sterling)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5a, One Pound
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5b, One Pound
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5c, One Pound
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £5 Central Bank of Ireland (Sterling)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5a, Five Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5b, Five Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5c, Five Pounds
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £10 Central Bank of Ireland (Sterling)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5a, Ten Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5b, Ten Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5c, Ten Pounds
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £20 Central Bank of Ireland (Sterling)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5a, Twenty Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5b, Twenty Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5c, Twenty Pounds
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £50 Central Bank of Ireland (Sterling)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5a, Fifty Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5b, Fifty Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5c, Fifty Pounds
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £100 Central Bank of Ireland (Sterling)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5a, One Hundred Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5b, One Hundred Pounds
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 5c, One Hundred Pounds

Lavery Type 6 – Central Bank of Ireland (Punts)

Sterling to Punts

 

The main difference between these notes and previous versions is the disappearance of the panels stating that this note was “Payable on Demand in London” and the word Sterling.  All banknotes issued by the Irish Free State and the Republic of Ireland between 1928 and 1977 were Sterling notes and guaranteed by the Bank of England – backed by Ireland’s ‘specie’ holdings in London.  They were also printed by the Bank of England in London.

  • The Central Bank of Ireland Banknotes, Type 6 (1960-1977)
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: 10/- Central Bank of Ireland (Punts)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 6, Ten Shillings
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £1 Central Bank of Ireland (Punts)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 6, One Pound
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £5 Central Bank of Ireland (Punts)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 6, Five Pounds
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £10 Central Bank of Ireland (Punts)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 6, Ten Pounds
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £20 Central Bank of Ireland (Punts)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 6, Twenty Pounds
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £50 Central Bank of Ireland (Punts)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 6, Fifty Pounds
    • O’Brien Banknote Guide: £100 Central Bank of Ireland (Punts)
      • Modern Irish Banknotes: Central Bank of Ireland, Lavery Type 6, One Hundred Pounds

B-Series

This series of notes was commissioned by the Central Bank of Ireland and circulated between 1976 and 1982.  The theme chosen for these notes was history of Ireland – each note featured a person from a particular era from early medieval to modern.  The Lady Lavery portrait, from Series A, was retained as a watermark.  A £100 note was designed but was never issued or circulated.  In 1976, Ireland broke from Sterling and ‘floated’ (with mixed results) as an independent currency.  They also coincided with the opening of the new (Irish) Mint run by the Central Bank at Sandyford, Co Dublin.

  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: One Pound, Irish Banknote, “B Series”
    • Series B – One Pound, Type 1 (C.H. Murray & M.N. O’Murchu)
    • Series B – One Pound, Type 2 (C.H. Murray & T. O’Cofaigh)
    • Series B – One Pound, Type 3 (T. O’Cofaigh & M.F. Doyle)
    • Series B – One Pound, Type 4 (M.F. Doyle & S.P. Cromien)
  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: Five Pounds, Irish Banknote, “B Series”
    • Series B – Five Pounds, Type 1 (T.K. Whitaker & C.H. Murray)
    • Series B – Five Pounds, Type 2 (C.H. Murray & M.N. O’Murchu)
    • Series B – Five Pounds, Type 3 (C.H. Murray & T. O’Cofaigh)
    • Series B – Five Pounds, Type 4 (T. O’Cofaigh & M.F. Doyle)
    • Series B – Five Pounds, Type 5 (M.F. Doyle & S.P. Cromien)
  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: Ten Pounds, Irish Banknote, “B Series”
    • Series B – Ten Pounds, Type 1 (C.H. Murray & T. O’Cofaigh)
    • Series B – Ten Pounds, Type 2 (T. O’Cofaigh & M.F. Doyle)
    • Series B – Ten Pounds, Type 3 (M.F. Doyle & S.P. Cromien)
  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: Twenty Pounds, Irish Banknote, “B Series”
    • Series B – Twenty Pounds, Type 1 (C.H. Murray & T. O’Cofaigh)
    • Series B – Twenty Pounds, Type 2 (T. O’Cofaigh & M.F. Doyle)
    • Series B – Twenty Pounds, Type 3 (M.F. Doyle & S.P. Cromien)
  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: Fifty Pounds, Irish Banknote, “B Series”
    • Series B – Fifty Pounds, Type 1 (T. O’Cofaigh & M.F. Doyle)
    • Series B – Fifty Pounds, Type 2 (M.F. Doyle & S.P. Cromien)
  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: One Hundred Pounds, Irish Banknote, “B Series”
    • This denomination was planned, designed + proofed, but was never issued.

C-Series

This series of notes is known as “Series C” and the designs are the output from a limited competition held in 1991 in which nine Irish artists were invited – the winner was Robert Ballagh. This series of notes had denominations of £5, £10, £20, £50 and £100 – with no pound note, since there a coin of this value circulating since 1990. The £20 was the first to be issued, following widespread forgery of the Series B (W.B. Yeats) £20 note. The theme for this series was people who contributed to the formation of a modern Ireland, and features politicians, a language, literary and religious figures.

  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: Five Pounds, Irish Banknote “C Series”
    • Series C – Five Pounds, Type 1 (F. Doyle & S.P. Cromien) 1994
      • Five Pounds (Type 1), HHH Replacement
    • Series C – Five Pounds, Type 2 (M. O’Conaill & P. Mullarkey) 1994-1998
      • Five Pounds (Type 2), HHH Replacement
      • Five Pounds (Type 2), MMM Replacement
  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: Ten Pounds, Irish Banknote “C Series”
    • Series C – Ten Pounds, Type 1 (F. Doyle & S.P. Cromien) 1993-1994
      • Ten Pounds (Type 1), JJJ Replacement
    • Series C – Ten Pounds, Type 2 (M. O’Conaill & P. Mullarkey) 1995-1999
      • Ten Pounds (Type 2), JJJ Replacement
      • Ten Pounds (Type 2), NNN Replacement
  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: Twenty Pounds, Irish Banknote, “C Series”
    • Series C – Twenty Pounds, Type 1 (F. Doyle & S.P. Cromien) 1992-1994
      • Twenty Pounds (Type 2), BBB Replacement
    • Series C – Twenty Pounds, Type 2 (M. O’Conaill & P. Mullarkey) 1995-1999
      • Twenty Pounds (Type 2), BBB Replacement
      • Twenty Pounds (Type 2), FFF Replacement
      • Twenty Pounds (Type 2), CCC Replacement
      • Twenty Pounds (Type 2), PPP Replacement
      • Twenty Pounds (Type 2), VVV Replacement
  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: Fifty Pounds, Irish Banknote, “C Series”
    • Series C – Fifty Pounds, Type 1 (F. Doyle & S.P. Cromien)
      • Fifty Pounds (Type 1), BBB Replacement
    • Series C – Fifty Pounds, Type 2 (M. O’Conaill & P. Mullarkey) 1995-1999
      • Fifty Pounds (Type 2), EEE Replacement
      • Fifty Pounds (Type 2), RRR Replacement
      • Fifty Pounds (Type 2), RRR Replacement
      • Fifty Pounds (Type 2), EEE Replacement
    • Series C – Fifty Pounds, Type 3 (M. O’Conaill & J.A. Hurley)
      • No replacement notes found yet
  • O’Brien Banknote Guide: One Hundred Pounds, Irish Banknote, “C Series”
    • Series C – One Hundred Pounds, Type 1 (M. O’Conaill & P. Mullarkey) 1996
      • One Hundred Pounds (Type 2), KKK Replacement
    • Series C – One Hundred Pounds, Type 2 (M. O’Conaill & J.A. Hurley) 2001
      • No replacement notes found yet

 


 

 

 

We buy current, recent and old banknotes

We buy banknotes from all over the world. This includes Irish, British, European and all countries worldwide. We especially like older (vintage) banknotes but will gladly accept your old holiday change, or accumulations in old wallets, junk boxes and attic clearances. Please note, some countries make their banknotes obsolete every 10 years or so, and these banknotes are no longer legal tender for foreign exchange purposes, e.g. Canada and Switzerland change their banknotes regularly to prevent counterfeiting and tax evasion.

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