A Bank of Ireland, Fourteenth Issue, One Pound note, Type 1, dated 22nd July 1918, signature of W.H. Baskin. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Early Irish Banknotes: 1918 Bank of Ireland (Fourteenth Issue, Type 1) One Pound note

Date: 1918-1919 Description: A Bank of Ireland One Pound note (Fourteenth Issue), Type 2 Issued on 22nd July 1918 Serial Number: A/27 89692 Signed by: William Haughton Baskin, Chief Cashier Obverse: The £1 note of this 14th issue of the Bank of Ireland series features 66 branches on eight lines and printed in red ink…

Bank of Ireland One Pound, Fourteenth Issue (Branches in 8 lines and red ink), Type 2, dated 17th February 1920, signature of A.G. Fleming, Chief Cashier. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Early Irish Banknotes: 1920 Bank of Ireland (Fourteenth Issue, Type 2) One Pound note

Date: 1920 Description: A Bank of Ireland One Pound note (Fourteenth Issue), Type 2 Issued on 17th February 1920 Serial Number: A/99 52079 Signed by: Alfred G. Fleming, Chief Cashier Obverse: The £1 note of this 14th issue of the Bank of Ireland series features 66 branches on eight lines and printed in red ink…

180_ Kinsale (Corporation), Threepence (for the convenience of change). The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Banknote Guide: 180(4) Kinsale Corporation (3d note)

Date: c.1804 Few people had silver or gold coins, and those who did, hoarded them and did not use them unless they really had to. Most of the smaller change in circulation was unofficial, illegal tokens. In short, there was a local currency crisis. The solution was small notes (an IOU) like the one below…

Edward I (1272-1307), Fifth Irish coinage, Silver Halfpenny, Cork Mint. Obv legend EDWR ANGLD NSHYB. Rev legend CIVI TAS CORC ACIE. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Coin Daily: Silver Halfpenny of Edward I, 5th Coinage (Cork Mint)

Date: 1297-1302 Description: A rare Silver Half Penny of Cork in the name of Edward I. This piece is an example of his fifth coinage and was minted in Cork between the years 1297 and 1302. Edward’s mint in Cork closed in 1302. A well-struck example, showing well-defined legends (lettering) and portrait. Traces of silver…

Edward IV, Heavy Cross and Pellets coinage, Groat, Cork, mm. not clear, large rosettes by neck, rev. civi tasc orca gie·, 2.24g (S 6316, DF 118ff). About F, extremely rare

Irish Coin Daily: Silver Groat of Edward IV, Heavy Portrait ‘Cross & Pellets’ coinage (Cork mint) 1465-66

  Date: c. 1465-66 Description: Edward IV, Heavy Cross and Pellets coinage, Groat, Cork Weight: 2.24g S. 6316; DF 118ff. About fine, the mint name clear, extremely rare Obverse: Crowned facing bust within tressure of arches, with inward facing lis on cusps, mm. not clear, large rosettes by neck + ЄDWΛRDVS : DЄI : GRΛ : DnS…

Coat of Arms: The Dublin Goldsmiths' Guild was 16th in order of precedence of the Dublin guilds when it was re-incorporated in 1637.

17th C Irish Banknotes

Early Irish Proto-Banknotes The origins of Irish banking can be traced back as far as the 17th C in Dublin where the Dublin Guild of Goldsmiths (now the only surviving medieval guild in Dublin) issued receipts for deposits of coins. Initially the currency notes took the form of receipts issued by goldsmiths, coin exchangers and…