1913 Bank of Ireland (Thirteenth Issue), Ten Pounds - signed: W.H. Baskin. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Early Irish Banknotes: 1913 Bank of Ireland (Thirteenth Issue), Type 1 – Ten Pounds – signed: W.H. Baskin

Date: 12th February 1913 Description: When the 13th issue of Bank of Ireland banknotes were first issued in 1908, there were 65 branches in the network, incl. seven new branches :- 1903: Athlone, Ballymena and Fermoy 1904: Coleraine, Tuam and Dunmanway 1907: Belturbet Between 1908 and 1918, the number of branches went up to sixty-six:-…

A Bank of Ireland, Fourteenth Issue, One Pound note, Type 1, dated 22nd July 1918, signature of W.H. Baskin. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Early Irish Banknotes: 1918 Bank of Ireland (Fourteenth Issue, Type 1) One Pound note

Date: 1918-1919 Description: A Bank of Ireland One Pound note (Fourteenth Issue), Type 2 Issued on 22nd July 1918 Serial Number: A/27 89692 Signed by: William Haughton Baskin, Chief Cashier Obverse: The £1 note of this 14th issue of the Bank of Ireland series features 66 branches on eight lines and printed in red ink…

Bank of Ireland One Pound, Fourteenth Issue (Branches in 8 lines and red ink), Type 2, dated 17th February 1920, signature of A.G. Fleming, Chief Cashier. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Early Irish Banknotes: 1920 Bank of Ireland (Fourteenth Issue, Type 2) One Pound note

Date: 1920 Description: A Bank of Ireland One Pound note (Fourteenth Issue), Type 2 Issued on 17th February 1920 Serial Number: A/99 52079 Signed by: Alfred G. Fleming, Chief Cashier Obverse: The £1 note of this 14th issue of the Bank of Ireland series features 66 branches on eight lines and printed in red ink…

Galway, Ballyglunin Estate (M I Blake) 8d truck token

O’Brien Coin Guide: Truck/Scrip Tokens of Ballyglunin Estate, Co Galway

Introduction: Perhaps one of the most dispicable practises of the so-called landlord classes in Ireland (and elsewhere) was the ‘truck’ system whereby employees were sometimes partly paid in ‘Truck’ Tokens, spendable only in the issuer’s own shops, where prices were generally higher than elsewhere. The word truck is derived from the French troquer, meaning to “exchange” or “barter”…