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O’Brien Coin Guide: GB & Northern Ireland Brass Threepence (George VI)


Background:

By the end of George V’s reign the threepence had become unpopular in England because of its small size but it remained popular in Scotland. It was consequently decided to introduce a more substantial ‘thru’penny bit’ which would have a more convenient weight/value ratio than the silver coinage.

  • The silver threepence continued to be minted, however, as there may have been some uncertainty about how well the new coin would be accepted.
  • In addition to this, silver threepences were still required in the British colonies.

George VI Brass Threepence

1937 GB & Northern Ireland brass threepence (The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin).

1937 GB & Northern Ireland brass threepence (George VI)

  • Edge: 12-sided, plain
  • Border: Teeth, and the teeth sit inside a narrow raised rim.
  • Weight: 21mm
  • Diameter: 6.8g

 

Obverse:

  • Bare head of King George VI facing left
    • Legend: GEORGIVS VI D: G: BR: OMN: REX FIDEI DEF
      • Full Latin Text: GEORGIVS VI DEI GRATIA BRITANNIARUM OMNIUM REX FIDEI DEFENSOR
      • Translation: George the Sixth, by the Grace of God, King of all the Britains, Defender of the Faith.
    • Designer:
      • Thomas Paget

Reverse:

  • A blossoming Sea Thrift plant, with three blooms
    • Legend: THREE PENCE
      • Date below
    • Designer:
      • Frances Madge Kitchener

 

Mintage & Market Values:

1937-52 GB & Ireland Brass Threepence (George VI) mintage & coin market values. (The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin)

1937-52 GB & Ireland Brass Threepence (George VI) mintage & coin market values

Notes:

Although most of the George VI brass threepences are still quite common, it is well worthwhile looking for minting errors. These can be worth up to €50 each – especially the more noticeable examples like the one illustrated below.

1943 GB & Ireland brass threepence 'striking' error (George VI)

1943 GB & Ireland brass threepence ‘striking’ error (George VI)

 

Further Reading:

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