Irish Banknote Guide: Six Guineas The Clonmel Bank (Watson’s Bank), c. 1800


Early Irish Banknotes - an illustrated catalogue of private banks, joint-stock banks and tradesmens' notes. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

The Clonmel Bank

Watson’s Bank was located on Johnston Street, in Clonmel and was founded by Solomon Watson in 1800, along with two of his brothers (John Watson and William Watson) as partners. The Watson’s were a well known Quaker family in Clonmel and their bank went through 3 partnership changes before ceasing operation in 1809.

In the Stamp Duty records of 1803, this bank is recorded as having paid stamp duty on 34,400 notes under Three Guineas and 1,500 notes under Ten Pounds. When John Watson was replaced as a partner by Robert Banfield, the bank was at the height of its financial success.

  • Following a series of private banking failures, the bank closed for the final time in 1809 and, it is believed, all creditors were paid in full.
  • Solomon Watson subsequently became the Dublin agent for Gordon’s Belfast Bank as partner in Messrs. Watson & Law.

Denominations issued included the following:

  • Six Guineas
    • (or, Six Pounds, Sixteen Shillings & Sixpence)
  • Half Guinea
    • (or, Eleven Shillings & Fourpence-halfpenny)
  • Nine Shillings

Promissory Note:

Six Guineas (Six Pounds, Sixteen Shillings & Sixpence)

180- Clonmell Bank, Six Guineas (Six Pounds, Sixteen Shillings and Sixpence) for Solomon Watson, John Watson and William Watson, unissued. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

 

Solomon Watson

  • Born: 14th July 1777
  • Died
  • Family Home: Summerville, Clonmel, Tipperary
    • Son of Solomon Watson and Mary Hill (6th of their 11 children)
    • Brother of:
      • John Watson, Born
      • Deborah Watson, Born
      • Sarah Watson, Born 1 Jul 1774
      • James Watson, Born
      • Elizabeth Watson, Born
      • Mary Watson, Born
      • William Watson, Born
      • Anne Watson, Born
      • Joshua Watson, Born
      • Samuel Watson, Born

 

 

 

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