Inchiquin Money, First issue, Crown, irregular flan stamped 19dwt: 8gr within beaded and wire-line border, 29.49g (S 6532; DF 274; KM. 41). About very fine, very rare

Irish Coin Daily: Inchiquin Money, First issue, Crown (Type 2)

Date: c. 1642   Description: Inchiquin Money, First issue, Crown, irregular flan, 29.49g (S 6532; DF 274; KM. 41) About Very Fine (aVF) or better for issue Very rare Obverse: Irregular flan stamped 19dwt: 8gr within beaded and wire-line border (Type 2)     Reverse:  Irregular flan stamped 19dwt: 8gr within double beaded and wire-line border (Type…

Inchiquin Money, First issue, Crown, irregular flan stamped 19dwt: 8gr within double beaded border, 29.62g (S 6532; DF 273; KM. 41). Very fine or better for issue, toned, very rare

Irish Coin Daily: Inchiquin Money, First issue, Crown (Type 1)

Date: c. 1642 Description: Inchiquin Money, First issue, Crown, irregular flan, 29.62g (S 6532; DF 273; KM. 41). Very fine or better for issue Toned Very rare Obverse: irregular flan stamped 19dwt: 8gr within double beaded border (Type 1)     Reverse: irregular flan stamped 19dwt: 8gr within double beaded border (Type 1) Country: Ireland…

Charles I (1625-1649), Confederate Catholics, ‘Rebel Money’, Crown, mm. pellet

O’Brien Rare Coin Review: Confederate Catholic Coinage of 1642-43 (Kilkenny/Rebel Money)

Introduction In the older literature, these coins are referred to as ‘Kilkenny Money’ but are now, more properly referred to as ‘Confederated Catholic Coinage’ or ‘Rebel Money.’ There are two opinions re who actually these enigmatic coins – one thinks they might have been minted by the Catholic Confederacy in Kilkenny from as early as September 1642…

James II, King of England, Scotland & Ireland

Monetary Crisis (1689), as James II Fixes Exchange Rates for Foreign Coins in Ireland

Introduction When James II succeeded his father in 1685, he continued to issue copper halfpennies, albeit via a ‘patent’ like his father did before him. This maintained the flow of small change but the same ‘decades old’ problem persisted with the large proportion of under-weight ‘clipped’ silver in circulation. This might have sufficed for transactions…

Ormonde Halfcrown. S.6545. Obv. Crown above C and R, a line circle around, and a somewhat crude blunt toothed outer border. Only cross of crown touches the inner line circle. Only the tail of the trailing R crosses the circle. A faint triangular pellet divides the C and R. The C has a near Roman top seraph, and no bottom seraph. Rev. Huge bold II, height 15.0mm, and shorter VI, height 11.3mm. All four corners of the IIVI cut across the inner line circle of 25.5mm diameter. Minute central pellet before V. An almost snakelike S with almost parallel Roman seraphs is centered above the II, and almost bisected by the line circle with bottom of top seraph of S just touching the outside of the inner circle. Well formed D, height 3.6mm, with a longer top seraph than bottom seraph, is above right side of V and closer to circle than to the V. Struck on an unusually round sterling plate flan, still showing part of original silver detail on obverse

O’Brien Coin Guide: The Ormonde Money of 1643-44

Introduction The 1642 ‘Lords Justices’ issues were followed in 1643 by a larger (fourth) emergency issue of better made, but still crude, silver coins. These are collectively known as ‘Ormonde Money’ since they were issued by the Lord Justice, the Earl of Ormonde (James Butler) some time between 1643-1644. Ormonde’s active career began in Ireland had begun…

Duke of Ormonde’s gold coinage of 1646-7, Pistole, Dublin, undated, stamped 4dwt 7grs both sides

O’Brien Coin Guide: Introduction to the Emergency Coinages of the Great Rebellion of 1641-52

Introduction Many people think of the Great Rebellion as a two-sided fight – the Irish Catholics versus the Anglo-Irish Protestants … but it was a lot more complicated than that. There were at least five opposing parties during the rebellion, which have been described by Carlyle as follows :- the Catholics of the Pale demanding…