Lady Lavery Notes - The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland

Irish Banknote Guide: The Transition from Irish Joint-Stock Bank Issues to Central Bank of Ireland Banknotes (1922-1943)

Introduction: The idea of a separate currency goes back to the sitting of the First Dáil Éireann in 1919 as this newly declared independent parliament declared its intention to govern all 32 counties of Ireland. Many Irish politicians declared that they wanted a completely independent republic – as called for in various speeches in the…

Coat of Arms: The Dublin Goldsmiths' Guild was 16th in order of precedence of the Dublin guilds when it was re-incorporated in 1637.

17th C Irish Banknotes

Early Irish Proto-Banknotes The origins of Irish banking can be traced back as far as the 17th C in Dublin where the Dublin Guild of Goldsmiths (now the only surviving medieval guild in Dublin) issued receipts for deposits of coins. Initially the currency notes took the form of receipts issued by goldsmiths, coin exchangers and…

1870 GB & Ireland silver three-halfpence (Victoria) - proof

O’Brien Coin Guide: GB & Ireland Silver Three-Halfpence

Introduction: The ‘three-halfpence’ was the smallest silver coin ever struck by the Royal Mint for circulation. It was worth ​11⁄2d (or ​1⁄160 of a pound) and was produced for circulation in the British colonies, specifically for use in British Guiana, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), Mauritius, Sierra Leone and the West Indies. They were a rough…