Irish Banknote Guide: Thirty Shillings (Gibbons & Williams’ Bank) 1833


Early Irish Banknotes - an illustrated catalogue of private banks, joint-stock banks and tradesmens' notes. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Gibbons & Williams Bank:

Gibbons & Williams was one of the last private banks to be founded in Ireland. Founded in 1833, it spectacularly collapsed in 1835 when the senior partner, Hutchins Thomas Williams, was found to have been embezzling client funds.

  • James Gibbons had parted company with him in 1834 and wasn’t involved in the bankruptcy and fraud litigation that followed.
1833 £5 Gibbons & Williams, Dublin, S/N 1042, payable in Dublin & London (obverse + reverse design). The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

1833 £5 Gibbons & Williams, Dublin, payable in Dublin & London (obverse + reverse design).

  • Gibbons & Williams banknotes are amongst the prettiest designs of the period and feature printing on the reverse – an innovation at that time.
    • Their ten and five pound notes were also payable in London
    • Their three pounds, thirty shillings and one pound notes were only payable in Dublin
  • Since 1826, all Irish banknotes (and currency) was in sterling.
    • 1826 was an unusual year for coinage, since two designs exist for many coins (one English + one British, to reflect the Act of Monetary Union in 1825)

Promissory Note:

Thirty Shillings

1833 30 shillings, Gibbons & Williams, Dublin S/N 25, dated 1st July 1833, signed by Hutchins Thomas Williams. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

1833 30 shillings, Gibbons & Williams, Dublin, 1st July 1833, signed by Hutchins T. Williams.

Gibbons & Williams thirty shillings promissory note, 39 Dame Street, Dublin and payable in both Dublin. Dated 1st July 1833, serial number: 25 and signed by H.T. Williams. This note is well circulated, with several counter-signatures and much creasing. It was also subjected to damage and staining around the edges.

Otherwise almost fine (aF).

 

 

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