1911 GB & Ireland silver threepence (George V). The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

O’Brien Coin Guide: GB & Ireland Silver Threepence of George V, Part 1

Introduction: The silver threepences of George V are very popular amongst collectors and are readily available in coin dealers’ bulk boxes, and at coin fairs, exhibitions and car boot sales. The first type (sterling issues) are much softer than their later (50% silver) counterparts and wear more easily, thus coins in the higher grades are…

1833 £1 Gibbons & Williams, Dublin, S/N 378, dated 1st July 1833 and signed by H.T. Hutchins. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Irish Banknote Guide: One Pound (Gibbons & Williams’ Bank) 1833

Gibbons & Williams Bank: Gibbons & Williams was one of the last private banks to be founded in Ireland. Founded in 1833, it spectacularly collapsed in 1835 when the senior partner, Hutchins Thomas Williams, was found to have been embezzling client funds. James Gibbons had parted company with him in 1833 and wasn’t involved in…

1797 Killarney, William Murphy, Sixpence ha'penny, 7 March 1797, signed by William Murphy. The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin, Ireland.

Early Irish Banknotes: Killarney, William Murphy (Sixpence ha’penny) 1797

The Killarney Bank: This ‘bank’ does not appear to have ever been registered and, if the stories about are anything to go by, its lack of official registration is easily explained. The bank was run by one William Murphy – a saddler in the town of Killarney – and his notes were used as small…

1836 GB & Ireland - Silver Groat (William IV). The Old Currency Exchange, Dublin

O’Brien Coin Guide: GB & Ireland Silver Groats of William IV

Introduction: The GB & Ireland “William IV” groats (or fourpence) were minted exclusively for use in British Guiana. The coin’s obverse design was simply copied from the Maundy Money groat of William IV but William Wyon produced a completely new design for the reverse. Prior to this introduction, British Sterling had problems being accepted as…