Irish Coin Daily: Copper Halfpenny of the Confederate Catholics, Kilkenny (1642-1643)


The Irish Coin Cabinet - a daily magazine featuring just 'best of breed' example of Irish numismatics per day. It will eventually accumulate into one of the finest archives of Irish coins in the world

Date: c. 1642-1643

IRELAND, Charles I, Confederate Catholics, Kilkenny Issues (1642-1643), Copper Halfpenny, crown over crossed sceptres, linear circle and legend surrounding both sides, rev crowned harp with C to left, R to right, 5.23g (DF 263; Nelson type I; S 6555). Quite weakly struck as usual, good fine, toned, rare

Description:

Charles I, Confederate Catholics, Kilkenny Issues (1642-1643), Copper Halfpenny, crown over crossed sceptres, linear circle and legend surrounding both sides, rev crowned harp with C to left, R to right, 5.23g (DF 263; Nelson type I; S 6555).

  • Quite weakly struck as usual
  • Good Fine (gF)
  • Toned
  • Rare

Country:

  • Ireland

Category:

  • Anglo-Norman
    • House of Stuart
  • Charles I
    • Confederate (Kilkenny) Money
    • Also known as “Rebel Money”
  • Hammered

 


Additional Information:

  • Charles I (1625-49)
    • After his succession, Charles quarrelled with the Parliament of England, which sought to curb his royal prerogative. Charles believed in the divine right of kings and thought he could govern according to his own conscience.
      • He caused the War of the Three Kingdoms, lost the English Civil War, was tried and convicted of treason. He was was beheaded in 1649.
  • Confederation of Kilkenny (1642-49)
    • When the Great Rebellion broke out in 1642, all hell broke loose in Ireland and multiple scores began to get settled amidst a haze of sectarian violence, land grabs, political intrigue and good old fashioned Irish internecine warfare.
    • The Catholic clergy exerted themselves to bring about union amongst the Catholics; and on the 24th of October 1642 a general assembly or parliament—delegates of the most distinguished persons from both sides—met in Kilkenny: this is known as the “Confederation of Kilkenny.”
      • There were eleven bishops, fourteen lords, and 226 commoners.
      • The assembly took upon themselves to govern the country—or that part of it outside the influence of Ormonde—and appointed generals over the army: O’Neill for Ulster and Preston for Leinster.
      • To manage affairs with greater facility they elected from their number a “Supreme council.”
      • And they issued a decree for raising money and for levying men, who were to be drilled by the officers that had come with Preston and O’Neill.

Further Reading:

 

 

 

 

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